New Leveled U.S. History Lessons: Westward Expansion and Great Depression

This week we've got two new differentiated sets of social studies lessons. These U.S. history lessons support CCSS reading and writing history standards as well as the C3 Framework.

Westward Expansion: How did the westward expansion of the United States affect the many different populations of people who journeyed west or encountered one another there? In these lessons, students read multiple texts written from different perspectives and analyze how the different people who encountered one another in the west experienced the westward expansion of the United States. View lessons >>

The Great Depression: Which of the attempted solutions to the Great Depression was most effective? These lessons give students an opportunity to practice integrating written and graphic texts by reading articles and graphs about ways that people in the United States tried to improve the economic situation during the Great Depression. View lessons >>

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This week we've also added new close-reading QuickCERCA lessons in Spanish and English.

The Noisy Ocean / El ruidoso océano (Grade 3-5): Students read about how marine animals use sound and how human-created sounds can impact marine animals.
Fingers and Fins, Wings and Hooves / Aletas y dedos, alas y pezuñas (Grade 6-8): Students learn about how animals evolved to have so many different kinds of limbs.
 

We also have three new direct instruction Minilessons in both Spanish and English about fundamental elements of argumentation:

Reasoning (CCSS.CCRA.R.8)

Counterargument (CCSS.CCRA.R.6)

Audience (CCSS.CCRA.R.6)

 

Claire Podulka

Claire Podulka

Claire has spent her career managing content creation of every possible sort, from print textbooks to marketing collateral to a travel blog. Having worked with major educational publishers and mobile companies, she brings project management and editorial expertise to her role at ThinkCERCA. She has a degree in journalism from Northwestern University and a PMP certificate from the Project Management Institute.